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EEOC Finds that Walmart’s Attendance Policy Likely Violates ADA, In the Midst of COVID-19 Pandemic

The EEOC recently issued a determination finding probable cause that Walmart's attendance policy violated the rights of Walmart workers under the ADA. The letter was made public by Virginia James, an A Better Balance client and disability rights advocate, in her Medium post published today: “Walmart’s Attendance Policy Penalizes Workers With Disabilities Like Me. The EEOC Agrees.” The determination is timely for those workers with disabilities who may feel particularly vulnerable during the COVID-19 public health emergency.

Were You Pregnant While Working at Walmart? You May Be Eligible for a Monetary Settlement

If you were pregnant while you worked at Walmart and the company denied your request for a workplace accommodation between March 19, 2013, and March 5, 2014, you may be eligible for a monetary settlement. Please go to the settlement website to learn more about the proposed settlement or to file a claim in the settlement. The deadline to file a claim, opt out, or object to the settlement is February 10, 2020.

Walmart’s Absence Policy Forces Pregnant Workers to Choose between a Healthy Pregnancy and a Pink Slip

Leigha Klopp was pregnant and working at Walmart. One morning, she woke up vomiting blood. She called the store to tell them that she was going to the hospital, on the advice of her obstetrician, and that she would need to miss work. When she returned for her next scheduled shift, Walmart fired her. We filed a class-action lawsuit against Walmart on behalf of Ms. Klopp and another former Walmart employee.

Press Release: Class-Action Lawsuit Alleges Walmart’s Absence Control Policy Discriminates Against Pregnant Workers

A Better Balance filed a class-action lawsuit today, challenging Walmart’s “no-fault” absence control policy as systemically violating the rights of women who need leave for pregnancy-related illnesses or medical care. The lawsuit is being brought on behalf of two former Walmart employees and is the first class action brought under New York's Pregnant Worker Fairness Act.
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