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Paid Sick Time Goes Into Effect in Pittsburgh After Years-Long Legal Battle 

In the midst of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the law’s implementation could not be more timely or critical. In addition to preventive care and personal/family illness or medical needs, Pittsburgh's paid sick leave law, like several others, allows workers to use sick time if: their workplace is closed by a public health official (due to a public health emergency); they need to care for their child if the child's school or care provider is closed for the same reason.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS: Pittsburgh, PA Paid Sick Time

  • March 16, 2020

In the midst of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) global pandemic, the CDC has recommended that everyone take steps to protect themselves and their communities, including avoiding close contact with others. If…

Public Health Closures and Paid Sick Time: What You Should Know

With the rapid spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), schools and businesses across the globe have closed their doors with the hope that keeping children and workers at home will help contain the outbreak. It is is very possible that schools and businesses in the U.S. will close in the coming weeks. Fortunately for workers in certain jurisdictions, they are eligible for paid sick time when their workplace or child’s school or place of care is closed for a public health emergency.

Update from the Courts: Victory for Paid Sick Leave in Pittsburgh!

Earlier this week, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court handed down a long-awaited decision upholding Pittsburgh’s paid sick time ordinance. The City of Pittsburgh, with assistance from A Better Balance and many other community organizations, passed the ordinance nearly four years ago to the day—on August 3, 2015—but its implementation had been on hold while a lawsuit against the law made its way through the court system.

Defending Local Democracy, Brief Bank

  • August 17, 2017

These briefs and decisions are meant to be used as a guide and the information contained in them do not constitute legal advice. Laws and judicial precedent vary in different…

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