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Unequal Pay for Black Women Shows Why We Must Dismantle Systemic Racism in Our Workplaces

Black women in the United States who work full time, year-round are typically paid just 62 cents for every dollar paid to white, non-Hispanic men—compared to 82 cents for women overall. For Black mothers, this gap is even more dismal: they earn just 50 cents for every dollar a white, non-Hispanic father makes. About 80 percent of Black mothers are the primary breadwinner for their families, and the wage gap means they have less money to support themselves and their families during these unprecedented times.

Equal Pay Day 2020: Challenges and Opportunities for Progress

The COVID-19 public health crisis underscores the need to ensure that women—who are the sole or co-breadwinner in most American households—are not facing additional hurdles to economic security. The wage gap contributes to higher rates of poverty for women and families, especially women of color and their families. At a time when many parents—especially single mothers—face precarious employment and the need to care for  children and loved ones, it is crucial that we ensure women and families have access to needed resources and support.

Women Are Now the Majority of the Workforce, But Our Laws Are Way Behind

Recent Labor Department data shows that women have now overtaken men as the majority of the labor force. Women have always worked and played a crucial role in our economy, but more than ever, it’s clear that our workplace laws are far behind. So this International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month, we’re calling for federal laws that will go a long way towards advancing gender equality.

Victory for Equal Pay: Court Upholds Philadelphia’s Salary History Ban

With this decision, Philadelphia’s workers will no longer be subject to questions about their salary history— a practice that enables employers to discriminate against groups that historically earn less from the outset of their careers, including women, people of color, and especially those who are mothers. In 2019, we successfully led a campaign to pass a New York State passed its own salary history ban, joining dozens of other jurisdictions in making this important step towards closing the wage gap and advancing gender equality.

On Latina Equal Pay Day, Let’s Demand Intersectional Solutions to Closing the Wage Gap 

November 20 is Latina Equal Pay Day—marking the day Latina women had to work into 2019 in order to match what white, non-Hispanic men made in 2018. That means Latina women had to work nearly two years to make what white, hispanic men made in just one year. The gender wage gap has many root causes, but it’s important to recognize that the pay gap for Latinas is attributable to sexism, racism, and anti-immigration policies, a multi-layered burden that white women do not face. 

New York’s New Equal Pay Laws: A Know-Your-Rights Toolkit

  • October 8, 2019
Knowledge is power. This toolkit is designed to help New Yorkers understand their rights under the State’s new salary history ban and its updated equal pay law. It explains what these laws do and provides answers to some frequently-asked questions about how these laws work. Understanding these laws can help you figure out whether you’re being underpaid and take action if you are.

PRESS RELEASE: Women in New York have new rights around equal pay, harassment, discrimination, and more

Written by A Better Balance’s team of women’s rights and civil rights lawyers, The Working Woman’s Pocket Guide offers a step-by-step guide to the employment rights and protections New York women have at work and when they may need time away from work. With sections on pay equity, harassment, discrimination, paid family leave, healthcare coverage, and more, the guide is an A-Z resource for working women.  

To Advance Women’s Equality, We Need Fairness for Pregnant Workers, Paid Leave, & Equal Pay

On August 26th, we celebrate Women’s Equality Day—a day commemorating the passage of the 19th amendment, which granted women the right to vote in 1920. This victory, it’s important to note, was not realized for all women until the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, when people of color were explicitly given the right to vote (a right that is still elusive for many today).

We Need An Intersectional Approach to Closing the Wage Gap for Black Women

August 22 is Black Women’s Equal Pay Day—marking the day Black women had to work into 2019 in order to match what white, non-Hispanic men made in 2018 alone. The gender wage gap is a widespread issue, but it’s crucial to recognize that Black women’s pay gap is caused by sexism and racism—a multi-layered burden that white women do not face.  
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