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The Case for the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, In Stories

We speak with pregnant workers every day who face an impossible choice. What do I do if my doctor advises that I request a simple accommodation to maintain a healthy pregnancy, like a stool to sit on or assistance with heavy lifting, but my employer won’t provide them? Do I keep earning my paycheck when I need it most, or follow my doctor’s orders? The women featured here faced such a choice.

Our Client Theresa Gonzales Speaks Out Against the Lack of Protections for Working Women in the South

Over the weekend, The New York Times published a powerful article featuring our client in Tennessee, Theresa Gonzales. Theresa, an admissions counselor and the sole breadwinner of her family who was about to become a first-time mother, told her employer, South College, she hoped to take six weeks of unpaid leave then return to her job. Instead, she was fired just days after giving birth because of a discriminatory policy only allowing a maximum of five days off from work.  As we told the Times, Theresa’s story is outrageously common.

Workers in Kentucky Now Have A Clear Right to Pregnancy Accommodations

Starting June 27, Kentucky women who are working while pregnant, recovering from childbirth, or who need to express breastmilk at work are protected under the law from discrimination. Kentucky law now gives workers an explicit right to reasonable pregnancy accommodations at work, so they can stay healthy and safe while continuing to earn a paycheck to support their family.   

Maine Legislature Passes Bill Granting Pregnant Workers the Right to Reasonable Accommodations

Today, after years of hard work from advocates, the Maine legislature passed the nation’s 27th law guaranteeing pregnant workers the clear right to reasonable accommodations when needed to keep them safe and on the job.The bill would make it illegal for Maine employers to discriminate against pregnant workers by denying them reasonable accommodations, if they can make those accommodations without undue hardship.
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