skip to Main Content

To Support Survivors of Domestic or Sexual Violence, We Need Paid Safe Leave Laws

Fortunately, a growing number of jurisdictions are recognizing the need for paid safe leave, to ensure workers don’t have to make the impossible choice between their physical safety and their economic security. In 11 states, 16 cities, and 3 countries, paid sick time laws contain “safe time” provisions to protect workers when they or their family members are victims of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault.

We Urge Congress to Enact Paid Leave for Federal Employees

We joined our partners in signing a letter urging Congress to keep the Federal Employee Paid Leave Act provision in the National Defense Authorization Act conference Agreement. There is a growing consensus across the country that paid leave is a necessity, and passing this measure would bring us one step closer to achieving paid leave for all! 

It’s National Work and Family Month, But Work-Life Balance Remains Elusive for Low Wage Workers

According to recent data, the gap between the richest and poorest U.S. households is the largest it's been in 50 years. This means that low income workers across the country are being left behind despite economic growth, too often struggling to make ends meet with a scarcity of time to care for themselves and their families.  So this National Work and Family Month, let’s demand justice and work-life balance for low income families

4 Policies To Advance Working Women’s Health & Well-Being

Policies that support working women and families are often not only a matter of economic justice, but also an urgent matter of public health. On National Women’s Health Day, here are four federal policies we must pass to ensure the health of working women and their families. 

To Advance Women’s Equality, We Need Fairness for Pregnant Workers, Paid Leave, & Equal Pay

On August 26th, we celebrate Women’s Equality Day—a day commemorating the passage of the 19th amendment, which granted women the right to vote in 1920. This victory, it’s important to note, was not realized for all women until the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, when people of color were explicitly given the right to vote (a right that is still elusive for many today).

Paid Family Leave Is Working in New York

The report’s data on men’s usage of paid family leave is another key indicator of the program’s success: nearly a third of those who took bonding leave were men. These findings coincide with the release of our new resource: Your Paid Family Leave Rights: A Guide for Dads and Male Caregivers in New York State. 

Celebrating Progress for LGBTQ Rights At Equality Federation’s 2019 Conference

Advocates in Georgia passed four local nondiscrimination ordinances that protect LGBTQ individuals, Massachusetts became the first state to pass a transgender-inclusive nondiscrimination law by referendum, and six more states have passed laws prohibiting the dangerous and discredited practice of conversion therapy. We were also excited to celebrate our role in passage of several new LGBTQ-inclusive paid leave laws and victories upholding local LGBTQ rights laws.

Our Client Theresa Gonzales Speaks Out Against the Lack of Protections for Working Women in the South

Over the weekend, The New York Times published a powerful article featuring our client in Tennessee, Theresa Gonzales. Theresa, an admissions counselor and the sole breadwinner of her family who was about to become a first-time mother, told her employer, South College, she hoped to take six weeks of unpaid leave then return to her job. Instead, she was fired just days after giving birth because of a discriminatory policy only allowing a maximum of five days off from work.  As we told the Times, Theresa’s story is outrageously common.

Celebrating A Major Paid Leave Win in OR, and National Progress!

This weekend, Oregon passed a robust and inclusive paid family & medical leave law, becoming the ninth state to do so nationwide. The law will provide up to 12 weeks of income to those who need to take time off work to recover from a serious health condition, care for a seriously ill loved one, or welcome a new child, with an additional two weeks of leave available for pregnancy-related complications.
Back To Top