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Overview of Paid Sick Time Laws in the United States:
Comparison Results

Updated on September 1, 2017

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Search Arizona California Berkeley Emeryville Los Angeles Oakland San Diego San Francisco Santa Monica Connecticut District of Columbia Illinois Cook County and Chicago, IL Massachusetts Maryland Montgomery County, MD Michigan Minnesota Duluth, MN Minneapolis, MN Saint Paul, MN New Jersey New York New York City, NY Westchester County, NY Oregon Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA Pittsburgh, PA Rhode Island Texas Austin, TX San Antonio, TX Vermont Washington Seattle, WA Tacoma, WA Colorado Dallas, TX
Can sick time be used for specific “safe time” purposes (related to domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking)? Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, but only when the worker is the victim. No, not beyond what is provided under the State’s paid sick time law. Pursuant to regulations, yes, but only when the worker is the victim. Yes, but only when the worker is the victim. No, not beyond what is provided under the State’s paid sick time law. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, but only as of January 1, 2017, and only when the worker is the victim. Yes, but only when the worker is the victim. Yes, but only when the worker is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, but only when the worker or the worker’s dependent child is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is a victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is a victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim (of a family offense matter, sexual offense, stalking, or human trafficking). No. However, the Westchester County Safe Time Leave Law (effective October 30, 2019) grants workers an additional 40 hours of paid leave per year for safe time purposes. Yes, but only when the worker or the worker’s minor child or dependent is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. No. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker's family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member (for safe time purposes: a child, spouse, parent, parent of a spouse or registered domestic partner, grandparent, or person with whom the worker has a dating relationship) is the victim. Yes, when the worker, the worker’s family member (for safe time purposes: a child, spouse, registered domestic partner, parent, parent of a spouse or registered domestic partner, grandparent, or person with whom the employee has a dating relationship) or certain members of the worker’s household (defined under Washington State law) is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member (for safe time purposes, also includes a parent-in-law or a person with whom the worker has a dating relationship, per Washington State law) is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim. Yes, when the worker or the worker’s family member is the victim.
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