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Paid Family Leave Is Working in New York

The report’s data on men’s usage of paid family leave is another key indicator of the program’s success: nearly a third of those who took bonding leave were men. These findings coincide with the release of our new resource: Your Paid Family Leave Rights: A Guide for Dads and Male Caregivers in New York State. 

How the Gig Economy Denies Its Workers Basic Rights

It’s long been a controversial fact that gig economy companies, like many driving, delivery, and home cleaning services, are able to circumvent federal and state labor protections by misclassifying their workers as independent contractors rather than employees. This allows these companies to increase their profit margins by denying their workers, who are ineligible to unionize, important benefits like paid sick time, paid leave, and paid time off.

Celebrating Progress for LGBTQ Rights At Equality Federation’s 2019 Conference

Advocates in Georgia passed four local nondiscrimination ordinances that protect LGBTQ individuals, Massachusetts became the first state to pass a transgender-inclusive nondiscrimination law by referendum, and six more states have passed laws prohibiting the dangerous and discredited practice of conversion therapy. We were also excited to celebrate our role in passage of several new LGBTQ-inclusive paid leave laws and victories upholding local LGBTQ rights laws.

FED WATCH: Trump’s Labor Secretary Pick Is A Threat To Working Families

President Trump has nominated Eugene Scalia, a labor lawyer with a long history of representing corporations against the interests of their employees, to be the next Labor Secretary. Scalia’s demonstrated hostility toward basic workers’ rights poses an alarming threat to American families.Scalia has opposed workplace protections for decades, beginning in the 1990s, when he campaigned against a rule requiring workplaces to warn their employees about repetitive stress injuries. Scalia has likewise spent his legal career representing large companies in their efforts to weaken workplace benefits and protections for their employees.

Know Your Rights As A Pregnant Worker: NY Times Features Our Resources & Former Clients

We spoke with The New York Times Parenting for their recent guide to knowing and exercising your rights when pregnant and working. “Women need to know their rights and feel like they can take advantage of the law for it to be meaningful,” ABB Co-President Dina Bakst told reporter Robin Shulman. The piece highlighted our state-by-state guide to the legal protections available to expecting and new parents.

Update from the Courts: Victory for Paid Sick Leave in Pittsburgh!

Earlier this week, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court handed down a long-awaited decision upholding Pittsburgh’s paid sick time ordinance. The City of Pittsburgh, with assistance from A Better Balance and many other community organizations, passed the ordinance nearly four years ago to the day—on August 3, 2015—but its implementation had been on hold while a lawsuit against the law made its way through the court system.

We Call On Congress to Pass The National Domestic Workers Bill of Rights

The nation’s 2.5 million domestic workers are excluded from the vast majority of federal and state laws granting basic workplace rights and protections, and there is little means of enforcing the protections they do have. This needs to change. We’re proud to support the National Domestic Workers Bill of Rights, which would ensure that domestic workers—including nannies, house cleaners, and home care workers—have the same fundamental rights as everyone else and are not left vulnerable to exploitation. 

Our Client Theresa Gonzales Speaks Out Against the Lack of Protections for Working Women in the South

Over the weekend, The New York Times published a powerful article featuring our client in Tennessee, Theresa Gonzales. Theresa, an admissions counselor and the sole breadwinner of her family who was about to become a first-time mother, told her employer, South College, she hoped to take six weeks of unpaid leave then return to her job. Instead, she was fired just days after giving birth because of a discriminatory policy only allowing a maximum of five days off from work.  As we told the Times, Theresa’s story is outrageously common.
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